Kim Kardashian admits she hit on Kanye 6 mouths after her 2nd marriage ended, Title I made the first move

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Kanye West seems obsessed with his wife but Kim says she was the one who made the first move, about six months after her marriage to Kris Humphries ended.

Speaking to Access Hollywood Kim said;

‘I think it was six months after I was newly single in like 2012, I was like why not? Like, what am I waiting for? I called Kanye because I’m sure it was really hurtful that I got married and, even though it’s not like we communicated all the time, I knew what he was thinking.And then – he’s always been a good friend to me, like, we’ve always been there for each other – then he invited me to a fashion show of his in Paris and I went, and then the magic happened.’

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She said she was at first hesitant to start dating so soon after her marriage ended but decided why not?

“But then in my head I was like, “You know what? Screw it. Like, this is probably what I’ve been waiting for, it’s been in front of my face.'” Speaking on how long it took before they finally got together, Kim said

‘When I first met [Kanye], we worked on a project together and there was definitely a spark, but we were in other relationships and we kept our distance”

We stayed in touch here and there and then when he wasn’t in relationships, you know, it’s just our timing would always not really coincide.

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15 Foods That Help You Stay Hydrated (Final)

These high-water-content foods are refreshing, filled with nutrients, and naturally low in calories.

Watermelon

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Water content: 91.5% water

It’s fairly obvious that watermelon is full of, well, water, but this juicy melon is also among the richest sources of lycopene, a cancer-fighting antioxidant found in red fruits and vegetables. In fact, watermelon contains more lycopene than raw tomatoes—about 12 milligrams per wedge, versus 3 milligrams per medium-sized tomato.

Although this melon is plenty hydrating on its own, Gans loves to mix it with water in the summertime. “Keep a water pitcher in the fridge with watermelon cubes in the bottom,” she says. “It’s really refreshing, and great incentive to drink more water overall.”

Spinach

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Water content: 91.4% water

Iceberg lettuce may have a higher water content, but spinach is usually a better bet overall. Piling raw spinach leaves on your sandwich or salad provides nearly as much built-in hydration, with an added nutritional punch.
Spinach is rich in lutein, potassium, fiber, and brain-boosting folate, and just one cup of raw leaves contains 15% of your daily intake of vitamin E—an important antioxidant for fighting off the damaging molecules known as free radicals.

Star fruit

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Water content: 91.4% water

This tropical fruit, also known as carambola, comes in sweet and tart varieties and has a juicy texture similar to pineapple. Its eye-catching shape looks great in a fruit salad or as an edible garnish on the rim of a summer cocktail, and as an added bonus it’s rich in antioxidants, especially epicatechin—a heart-healthy compound also found in red wine, dark chocolate, and green tea.
One note of caution: People with kidney problems should
avoid star fruit because of its high levels of oxalic acid.

Strawberries

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Water content: 91.0%

All berries are good foods for hydration, but juicy red strawberries are easily the best of the bunch. Raspberries and blueberries both hover around 85% water, while blackberries are only slightly better at 88.2%.

“I love strawberries blended in a smoothie or mixed with plain nonfat yogurt—another hydrating food,” Gans says. Strawberries add natural sweetness to the yogurt, she adds, and the combo of carbohydrates, fiber, and protein make a great post-workout recovery snack.

Broccoli

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Water content: 90.7%

Like its cousin cauliflower, raw broccoli adds a satisfying crunch to a salad. But its nutritional profile—lots of fiber, potassium, vitamin A, and vitamin C—is slightly more impressive. What’s more, broccoli is the only cruciferous vegetable (a category that contains cabbage and kale, in addition to cauliflower) with a significant amount of sulforaphane, a potent compound that boosts the body’s protective enzymes and flushes out cancer-causing chemicals.

Grapefruit

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Water content: 90.5%

This juicy, tangy citrus fruit can help lower cholesterol and shrink your waistline, research suggests. In one study, people who ate one grapefruit a day lowered their bad (LDL) cholesterol by 15.5% and their triglycerides by 27%. In another, eating half a grapefruit—roughly 40 calories—before each meal helped dieters lose about three and a half pounds over 12 weeks. Researchers say that compounds in the fruit help fuel fat burn and stabilize blood sugar, therefore helping to reduce cravings.

Baby carrots

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Water content: 90.4%

A carrot’s a carrot, right? Not when it comes to water content. As it turns out, the baby-sized carrots that have become a staple in supermarkets and lunchboxes contain more water than full-size carrots (which are merely 88.3% water).

The ready-to-eat convenience factor is hard to top, as well. Snack on them right out of the bag, dip them in hummus or guacamole, or—for a bit of added crunch and bright orange color—chop them up and add them to salads or salsas.

Cantaloupe

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Water content: 90.2%

This succulent melon provides a big nutritional payoff for very few calories. One six-ounce serving—about one-quarter of a melon—contains just 50 calories but delivers a full 100% of your recommended daily intake of vitamins A and C.

“I love cantaloupe as a dessert,” Gans says. “If you’ve got a sweet tooth, it will definitely satisfy.” Tired of plain old raw fruit? Blend cantaloupe with yogurt and freeze it into sherbet , or puree it with orange juice and mint to make a refreshing soup .

SOURCE: health.com

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