6 Tips To Reduce Employee Theft

Storeowners don’t want to think their employees will steal from their store. But every day merchants discover that their trusted staff members have done exactly that. According to a retail theft survey conducted by Jack L. Hayes International, a loss prevention consulting firm, one out of every 40 employees was apprehended for theft by their employer in 2012. The survey also found that on average, employees steal 5.5 times more than shoplifters on a per-case average ($715.24 vs $129.12).

Thankfully, there are ways to surround yourself with staff you can trust. Here are six tips from our experts:

Weed out bad apples.

Run a background screening and a drug test on all potential hires. Employees with drug addictions are at higher risk for stealing to support their habit. “I believe that past behavior is a good predictor of future behavior,” says King Rogers, chief executive officer of the King Rogers Group, a loss prevention and security management consulting company. “If someone has been convicted of theft in the past, then you don’t want them handling your money.”

Use the buddy system.

Often theft happens when one employee is alone in the store or at the register. Doyle recommends having two employees work for both opening and closing to limit opportunity. Always have refunds and voids witnessed by a second employee or a manager as well, says Mark Doyle, president of Jack L. Hayes International. Rotate the employees paired together and avoid having close friends witness transactions for each other.

Keep a virtual eye on employees. Continue reading 6 Tips To Reduce Employee Theft

WE WILL NEVER SERVE YOUR GOD

(A Must Read For Every Pastor & Parents)

At her father’s funeral the pastor’s daughter (who was a prostitute) watched and listened as church members described all wonderful deeds done by the pastor of 10,000 capacity church and worldwide television ministry.

They spoke about his care, love, generosity, miracles, signs and wonders and tenderness when he was alive.
But after the funeral the daughter of the late pastor asked her siblings and her mother – who was that man those people were talking about at the funeral – is he the same man that raised us?

They must be telling lies. All the children including Jack (a drug addict) agreed that they were telling lies.

But their mother said they were not telling lies,
YOUR FATHER WAS A GOOD PASTOR, BUT A BAD HUSBAND AND BAD FATHER,
HE GROOMED AND GREW THE CHURCH BUT LEFT HIS FAMILY GROANING.

FIRE WAS IN HIS BONE TO WORK FOR GOD, BUT LOVE, AFFECTION AND INTIMACY WAS NEVER IN HIS MIND FOR HIS FAMILY, I WAS HIS WIFE, CHURCH WAS HIS MISTRESS, HE LOVED THE MISTRESS AND ABANDONED HIS WIFE,
HE WON THE CHURCH BUT LOST HIS FAMILY, WHAT A SHAME!

The children later wrote and placed on his tomb:
Continue reading WE WILL NEVER SERVE YOUR GOD

Business Tips: Management Skill – Effective Meetings Part 1

Very few things are more frustrating, especially when you are busy, than to be constantly called into meetings that are a waste of time. They start late, don’t appear to have an agenda or objective, no conclusion or action is reached, people arrive late and the meeting stops to update them, people are allowed to speak at length who don’t really have anything to contribute, someone answers a phone call on their mobile, and nothing new or interesting comes out of the meeting.

This happens because whoever has called the meeting has not managed it effectively. A good meeting has only the attendees who need to be there, everyone knows it will start on time, and if they are late they will have to catch up outside the meeting, a focused agenda has been circulated prior to the meeting, there is an objective, and the meeting is chaired by someone who does not allow time to be wasted, and works towards a clearly defined objective.

Managing effective meetings

If you call a meeting, respect the time of the attendees. Bear in mind, in a busy office, that many of your colleagues will have to take work home and catch up on it at the evenings and weekends, and so effectively you are using their own time for your meeting. This thought will enforce some discipline in the management of the meeting.
Similarly, if you are asked to attend a meeting, try to show the same consideration for colleagues. Participate if you have something to offer, be part of the discussion, contribute ideas and answer questions. Be supportive to the chairman, offer ideas, ask sensible questions, and share relevant experience.

A good meeting utilises the experience of the group and facilitates employee engagement and alignment.
Often meetings are events where new colleagues or young people can get noticed and make an impression. Make sure the impression is a good one, the last thing you need is to make a poor impression on senior people.

You want your meetings to be known as being effective, a good use of time. You want everyone to know they will start right on time, move along quickly, interruptions and irrelevancies will not be welcomed, and the meeting will draw to a swift a prompt end with action points allocated, conclusions drawn and meeting minutes will be circulated promptly. You respect your colleagues’ time and you expect them to respect yours.

Meetings as social interactions
Continue reading Business Tips: Management Skill – Effective Meetings Part 1